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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I finally got around to replacing my rear shock mounts yesterday and rotated the tires while I was at it. Apparently I am a dumbass and not qualified to change a tire because as I was parked in the driveway I noticed my front drivers side wheel was real slanted. Further inspection showed it was only hanging on with one lug. I'm lucky it didn't fall off on me in the 20 miles back from the hobby shop on the highway.

I've got some Fuel Hostage wheels running 35" tires.

My question is are the torque specs for oversize/of road tires the same as the stock ones? If not, does it vary between manufacturers?

Thanks
 

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I always do a
Blam blam blam blam with a impact
Then go back around them with a blam blam

Or 75-100 foot should be plenty
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I always do a
Blam blam blam blam with a impact
Then go back around them with a blam blam

Or 75-100 foot should be plenty
My problem was the impact I believe. I wasn't comfortable with the setting and got in a hurry cause the shop was closing and my g/f was on my ass to come home and hang out with her and the parents so I ended up rushing it and paid the price.

It doesn't help that you can't get a standard lug wrench in the narrow holes in these tires so I'm really just guessing with how tight they are.
 

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I am a firm believer of always using a torque wrench whenever installing my tire and wheels. The proper torque for a TJ is 100-110 ft lbs. recommendations are to recheck the torque after 25-50 miles.
 

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Full Size Jeep Dr.
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100 ft-lbs is what I use, second on the torque wrench and a recheck.
 

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Abe Froman
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What everyone suggested will work. I always do mine to 100 foot pounds. All these torques are dry torques. Anti-seize will lower that number, but I do not remember by how much.
 

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I am a firm believer of always using a torque wrench whenever installing my tire and wheels. The proper torque for a TJ is 100-110 ft lbs. recommendations are to recheck the torque after 25-50 miles.
Agreed. I use a torque wrench and do 105 ft lbs and recheck the torque after about 50mi.
 

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I use anti-seize and torque wrench at 105lbs.
 

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I use anti-seize and torque wrench at 105lbs.
:eek: Whoa!!! The use of antiseize on threads means you need to lower your torque values by about 20% to keep the same clamping force, your lug nuts are now equal to the clamping force of close to 130 ft-lbs. of torque without the antiseize.

Once antiseize is applied to the threads, you need to lower the torque value down around 20% so 70-85 ft-lbs is as much as you should be using on your lug nuts once antiseize is applied to the threads. That gives roughly the same clamping force of from 85-110 ft-lbs (factory spec) the factory recommends without antiseize.
 

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From what I understand the reason anti seize is so bad. Is if too much is applied and it isn't wiped off the lugs can fall off.
No, the lugs (lug nuts) won't fall off. The only issue with antiseize is it lubricates the threads so well that tightening the lug nuts to the usual amount of torque causes too much clamping force, which is to say the lug nut is holding the wheel with too much force which is hard on the wheel studs which could cause them to fail.

The simple bottom line is if you apply anti-seize to the threads of a bolt, you simply need to reduce the torque you tighten it to by about 20%. So for example if the normal torque a bolt is tightened to is 100 ft-lbs., you would reduce that to 80 ft-lbs once antiseize was applied to the threads which will provide the same amount of clamping force.
 

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No, the lugs (lug nuts) won't fall off. The only issue with antiseize is it lubricates the threads so well that tightening the lug nuts to the usual amount of torque causes too much clamping force, which is to say the lug nut is holding the wheel with too much force which is hard on the wheel studs which could cause them to fail.

The simple bottom line is if you apply anti-seize to the threads of a bolt, you simply need to reduce the torque you tighten it to by about 20%. So for example if the normal torque a bolt is tightened to is 100 ft-lbs., you would reduce that to 80 ft-lbs once antiseize was applied to the threads which will provide the same amount of clamping force.
Huh learn something new every day! I just say avoid anti seize as much as you can. If your studs are so bad that they seize up... Just replace your studs
 

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Properly used, antiseize is excellent stuff. It can prevent galling between the studs & lug nuts, that is why I use it. Haven't had to replace a stud or a lug nut since I began using antiseize on the studs 10-12 years ago. Reducing the torque setting by 20% is a no-extra effort requirement.

Smart mechanics use it in areas subject to seizing or galling. It is a real effort and time saver, not to mention thread and hardware saver, on areas like the tie rod threads, transfer case skidplate bolts, etc.
 

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Properly used, antiseize is excellent stuff. It can prevent galling between the studs & lug nuts, that is why I use it. Haven't had to replace a stud or a lug nut since I began using antiseize on the studs 10-12 years ago. Reducing the torque setting by 20% is a no-extra effort requirement.

Smart mechanics use it in areas subject to seizing or galling. It is a real effort and time saver, not to mention thread and hardware saver, on areas like the tie rod threads, transfer case skidplate bolts, etc.
Use of anti seize and a torque wrench is what separates the men from the boys! Lol, IMHO
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for the input. Went and bought a jack and some anti-seize and dummy me forgot to buy more lugnuts.

Do offroad/oversize tires just use the stock lug nuts? Or something different? I know the Fuel Hostage wheels have a narrow insertion channel so doesanyone know will standard lugs fit in there?
 

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Full Size Jeep Dr.
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Standard lugs should be fine.
 
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