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Replacing lower and upper control arm assemblies with new OEM control arm assemblies is super easy and I highly recommend it! Now if you choose to just replace the old dry rotted rubber bushings with new rubber or poly that requires a whole lot more work. You need a ball joint press or press to push out the old ones. I have a 2005 TJ Rubi and when taking turns at speed it got kind of wobbly/exciting in a bad way. Replacing the OEM 2005 dry rotting rubber bushings with new Poly bushings made a HUGE difference in handling. If you search the forum for Control Arms or Bushing you will find others peeps also saw significant improvement in handling after changing out the +/-16year old Control Arms and/or bushings.
 

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I started the process of wire brushing and lubricating the rear shock upper bolts. Man, they look ugly!

View attachment 4525248
Make sure you're using a good penetrant like Kroil, Liquid Wrench, or Break-Free... in that order. Liquid Wrench gives the best bang for the buck though. Don't waste your time using PB-Blaster or WD-40 on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Make sure you're using a good penetrant like Kroil, Liquid Wrench, or Break-Free... in that order. Liquid Wrench gives the best bang for the buck though. Don't waste your time using PB-Blaster or WD-40 on them.
Started using Kroil yesterday and planning to do the job on Saturday. Is 1x per day (today, tomorrow, Friday and Saturday) sufficient or do I need to increase the frequency or give it a few more days beyond Saturday?
 

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Started using Kroil yesterday and planning to do the job on Saturday. Is 1x per day (today, tomorrow, Friday and Saturday) sufficient or do I need to increase the frequency or give it a few more days beyond Saturday?
That schedule is great, let's just hope they're not so corroded that it won't work. It's great stuff but it can't work miracles lol.
 

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2006 Rubicon. From what I can tell and from what I've been advised, I need to replace the Control Arms (particularly the lower CAs) and the Tie Rods/ends. I am relative new to working on cars/Jeeps, so thinking that I need to start with the "easier job." My mechanical experience so far is limited to replacing radiator, rad hoses, tensioner, idler pulley, oil change and transmission fluid change. From what I have read/seen, both of these jobs (control arms and tie rods) are relatively easy.
BUT which job is easier for the novice mechanic to build up experience??😂
Simple way to set if you need to do this work. Jack the jeep up by the frame, so the wheels are off the ground and free floating. Then BY HAND wiggle the tires back and forth, see if there any play, do this up and down as well. Then get a pry bar, and start trying to move the CA's and tie-rods, if there's slop, then a replacement should be done.

To do the replacement PROPERLY, do the whole thing at the same time, justt fixing one issue will cause the next marginal parts to fail, and you're back at it again.

Remember, just because there's dirt, dust, or even some cracking on your bushings doesn't mean they are bad. It's only when they MOVE in a direction they are not designed to move that you should consider replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Simple way to set if you need to do this work. Jack the jeep up by the frame, so the wheels are off the ground and free floating. Then BY HAND wiggle the tires back and forth, see if there any play, do this up and down as well. Then get a pry bar, and start trying to move the CA's and tie-rods, if there's slop, then a replacement should be done.

To do the replacement PROPERLY, do the whole thing at the same time, justt fixing one issue will cause the next marginal parts to fail, and you're back at it again.

Remember, just because there's dirt, dust, or even some cracking on your bushings doesn't mean they are bad. It's only when they MOVE in a direction they are not designed to move that you should consider replacement.
Thanks! This is helpful.
 

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I started the process of wire brushing and lubricating the rear shock upper bolts. Man, they look ugly!
You're cleaning and lubricating the threads and not just the heads of the bolts right? There is room between the tub and the gas tank support to get a wire brush in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 · (Edited)
You're cleaning and lubricating the threads and not just the heads of the bolts right? There is room between the tub and the gas tank support to get a wire brush in there.
Not sure that I have a clear picture of what you are describing. How do you access the space between the tub and gas support?
 

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Lots of advice from experienced folks, here is what I did. The front shocks were just ordinary shock replacement. Very simple. On the rear shocks, I sprayed them and let them soak overnight. Then I took my 1/4" impact wrench and used two extensions and the socket in order to reach upper nuts and they spun right off. I purposely used my 1/4" impact wrench because I read so many reports of folks breaking them off. Other than having dirt rain down on me, I had no problem with the rear shocks (Rancho 5000Xs).

I also did my lower and upper CAs. I bought Moog arms from Rock Auto. My LJ has 113,000 miles on it and the handling was just getting a little loose. The lower arms were nothing. I had more trouble with the upper getting the bushing out on the passenger side, but I was just getting the hang of it on that one. By the time I got to the one on the pumpkin it was just press the old one out and press the new one in (I used the press from Advance Auto so no cost for using the tool as long as I returned it).

I also replaced the bushings on my sway bar and replaced the sway bar end links. Finally I replaced the tires. I did this stuff stepwise so as not to have to write a big check all at one time. I didn't replace anything else as I could not find any slop during the "have someone turn the wheel and look for looseness test".

So how is it now? Totally transformed the handling, well worth the time and dollars.

Good luck,

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
After 5+ hours of wrestling with rusty bolts, I successfully replaced all my old stock shocks with Rancho RS5000x.

With the experience under my belt, I could probably cut that wrench time in half next time around.

The ride is much smoother. Night and day. I still need to address my “loose” steering. Dry steering test is in order is next.

Appreciate all the advice here, particularly on the rear shock bolts. I doused those bolts in Kroil for days (spraying and wire brushing behind the fender liner) and they gave me a good fight, but all came out in tact through some very careful wrenching. The squeaky noise they made when they finally broke loose was scary (and unexpected)! Kroil truly is a miracle liquid.

Honestly, the hardest part was the bottom bolts on the rear shocks. They gave me one hell of a workout.

Thanks again for all the advice!
 
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