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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I got The Muddog two and a half years ago, I wanted More Light out front. I hadn't had any experience in lighting for 25 years, so when I started looking, I found out that I had a lot to learn, or relearn.
My original plan was for halogen driving and fog lights, maybe a couple sealed beam spots.
So I hit up the local off road parts places in search of them.
"Oh no", I was told, "Nobody runs halogen any more. LED and HID lights are what you want."
After a few weeks listening to this, as well as not enough online research, I bought into the "LEDs are the greatest thing in lighting" bit. I decided on a pair of 42 watt LED spots, and a 12" LED bar would do what I wanted them to do.
I ordered them, set up my switch panel, ran my wiring, and installed them.
These things were BRIGHT!! Even in broad daylight! After all, they were rated a 6000 Kelvin on the color temperature scale, and daylight at high noon is only 5600.
For me, and maybe being 63 years old has something to do with it, they were TOO bright. Every thing looked like an over exposed picture, or like the brightness level on the T.V. was up too high.
I've since replaced the LEDs with a couple pair of Rampage 55 watt halogen driving lights, and NOW I can really light up the night to a useful level.
Along with the Busdepot headlights someone else here recommended, and a pair of Hella 550 fog lights I can see anything and everything.
Anybody else have a similar experience?
 

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After all, they were rated a 6000 Kelvin on the color temperature scale, and daylight at high noon is only 5600.
The Kelvin rating has nothing to do with how bright they are, that's about the color of the light produced. Some colors are harsh on the eyes, others are not. 6000 is more blue than white and that is harsh to our eyes.

Most LED/HID headlights have a much lower Kelvin rating since 6000 produces a very harsh bluish light that most find highly objectionable. I know I certainly do.

A Kelvin rating of closer to 4200 to 4500 would have been just as bright (brightness is rated in lumens) but with a color your eyes would have been a lot more comfortable with.

Someone probably mislead you on what to choose.

Here's a pretty fair article that talks about it... http://www.accessconnect.com/color_temperature.htm
 

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Overall, my Trucklites are significantly better then OEM and the Hella H4s I had prior. But I do miss the color of the old lights.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The Kelvin rating has nothing to do with how bright they are, that's about the color of the light produced. Some colors are harsh on the eyes, others are not. 6000 is more blue than white and that is harsh to our eyes.

Most LED/HID headlights have a much lower Kelvin rating since 6000 produces a very harsh bluish light that most find highly objectionable. I know I certainly do.

A Kelvin rating of closer to 4200 to 4500 would have been just as bright (brightness is rated in lumens) but with a color your eyes would have been a lot more comfortable with.

Someone probably mislead you on what to choose.

Here's a pretty fair article that talks about it... Light Color Temperature In Automotive Lamps And Bulbs
I realize that it's more about color that lumens, but that's how all the LEDs I looked were rated. I know that Quadratec has more pertinent information than that, but they also have higher prices than I wanted to pay.
Most of the non-vehicle LEDs, (work lights and such), I say look the same to me, over bright.
For those that LEDs work for, I suppose they're great. They just didn't work for me.
The main reason I asked the question is that a lot of other people I talk to are of the same opinion I am. Maybe it's an "Old Guy" thing. I just thought it would be an interesting discussion.
Just as an aside, mt work truck, (Freightliner) has HIDs, and I have no complaint about them.
 

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We got along just for for years without LEDs. My buddies have them and I too hate the harshness. I see just fine with my good old halogens and KC spotlights. I did upgrade the bulbs in the old 97 however. But not LEDs.
I don't need the perceived latest and greatest to have a good time!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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We got along just for for years without LEDs. My buddies have them and I too hate the harshness. I see just fine with my good old halogens and KC spotlights. I did upgrade the bulbs in the old 97 however. But not LEDs.
I don't need the perceived latest and greatest to have a good time!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
If you daily drive the Jeep, things are a bit different. The world has moved on to brighter lights and more visibility. One reason I made the switch to LED headlights, taillights, markers and turn signals was because I didn't like being the dimmest vehicle on the road. It's a safety consideration.
 

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I realize that it's more about color that lumens, but that's how all the LEDs I looked were rated. I know that Quadratec has more pertinent information than that, but they also have higher prices than I wanted to pay.
Most of the non-vehicle LEDs, (work lights and such), I say look the same to me, over bright.
For those that LEDs work for, I suppose they're great. They just didn't work for me.
The main reason I asked the question is that a lot of other people I talk to are of the same opinion I am. Maybe it's an "Old Guy" thing. I just thought it would be an interesting discussion.
Just as an aside, mt work truck, (Freightliner) has HIDs, and I have no complaint about them.
I think you missed the point of my post... if you had simply bought LEDs with a lower Kelvin temperature rating like 4200-4500 (certainly nothing higher than 5000) at the highest which means they'd be whiter and away from the blue color your LEDs are putting out with their 6000 Kelvin rating, you'd have been happy with them.

Your issue has nothing to do with the lumen rating. LEDs with the correct lower 4200 to 4500 Kelvin rating are fine and don't make it look like things are overexposed. Like lighting a room with blue instead of white lights.... it just isn't going to look right, blue lighting is hard on the eyes. When you see a car coming toward you with harsh blue headlights, they have a Kelvin rating like your 6000 rating. Kids seem to like them regardless of if the blue color hurts the eyes of oncoming drivers. we adults don't.

Just pay attention to the Kelvin rating next time so you don't think all LED headlights have the problem yours do.

P.S. Good quality LED lighting is not just for the younger people. You are 63 but I am 69. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think you missed the point of my post... if you had simply bought LEDs with a lower Kelvin temperature rating like 4200-4500 (certainly nothing higher than 5000) at the highest which means they'd be whiter and away from the blue color your LEDs are putting out with their 6000 Kelvin rating, you'd have been happy with them.

Your issue has nothing to do with the lumen rating. LEDs with the correct lower 4200 to 4500 Kelvin rating are fine and don't make it look like things are overexposed. Like lighting a room with blue instead of white lights.... it just isn't going to look right, blue lighting is hard on the eyes. When you see a car coming toward you with harsh blue headlights, they have a Kelvin rating like your 6000 rating. Kids seem to like them regardless of if the blue color hurts the eyes of oncoming drivers. we adults don't.

Just pay attention to the Kelvin rating next time so you don't think all LED headlights have the problem yours do.

P.S. Good quality LED lighting is not just for the younger people. You are 63 but I am 69. :)
Well, I DID say that I probably didn't do enough research.:blackeye And the only way I even heard about the Kelvin rating was the online research I did. I think that all the LEDs I looked were rated 6000 Kelvin, with higher ratings available. Basically, I didn't know enough to know how much I DIDN'T know.
:confused:
But I see a LOT of LED lights and bars that seem to have the same over bright, (blueish) light that I don't like.
I always appreciate your input, Jerry, and I've always found it enlightening even if it's about a concern I don't immediately have. :worthy:
Perhaps if we'd have had THIS conversation before I got the LEDs I did, I wouldn't have the disdain I do for them. And maybe this conversation will help somebody make a more informed decision than I did.

P.S. Old guys rule!:D
 
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I do a lot of night driving and see just fine with the stock lighting on my TJ. Don't understand why young people (yes I'm touching 60yo) have to swap in these super bright lights of different colors. More of a hazard to the on coming traffic from blinding the people in the other lane.
 

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I do a lot of night driving and see just fine with the stock lighting on my TJ. Don't understand why young people (yes I'm touching 60yo) have to swap in these super bright lights of different colors. More of a hazard to the on coming traffic from blinding the people in the other lane.
Good headlights have a focused cut off that won't blind oncoming traffic. What your are seeing are the cheap Chinese knockoffs and LED conversions that throw light everywhere.
 

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When I got The Muddog two and a half years ago, I wanted More Light out front. I hadn't had any experience in lighting for 25 years, so when I started looking, I found out that I had a lot to learn, or relearn.
My original plan was for halogen driving and fog lights, maybe a couple sealed beam spots.
So I hit up the local off road parts places in search of them.
"Oh no", I was told, "Nobody runs halogen any more. LED and HID lights are what you want."
After a few weeks listening to this, as well as not enough online research, I bought into the "LEDs are the greatest thing in lighting" bit. I decided on a pair of 42 watt LED spots, and a 12" LED bar would do what I wanted them to do.
I ordered them, set up my switch panel, ran my wiring, and installed them.
These things were BRIGHT!! Even in broad daylight! After all, they were rated a 6000 Kelvin on the color temperature scale, and daylight at high noon is only 5600.
For me, and maybe being 63 years old has something to do with it, they were TOO bright. Every thing looked like an over exposed picture, or like the brightness level on the T.V. was up too high.
I've since replaced the LEDs with a couple pair of Rampage 55 watt halogen driving lights, and NOW I can really light up the night to a useful level.
Along with the Busdepot headlights someone else here recommended, and a pair of Hella 550 fog lights I can see anything and everything.
Anybody else have a similar experience?
I'm rocking 4 KC Daylighters, and love the look of them. I recently bought some LED headlights and they were veryyyyy bright but it just made driving at night not the same, it just didn't fit the ol' TJ character so I switched back to stock headlights. BTW I'm 19 so not all of us young people love the LED look!:thumb:
 
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Good headlights have a focused cut off that won't blind oncoming traffic. What your are seeing are the cheap Chinese knockoffs and LED conversions that throw light everywhere.
Well what ever they are surely can't be DOT approved and shouldn't sold in a configuration that would allow on road use, ie: headlight conversions.
 
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It may just be me but LEDs don't seem to work as well in the rain to me. They throw out a lot of light but I just can't seem to see as well when the weather is bad. LEDs also don't make heat so they won't melt snow and ice like halogens do. I don't deal with that one much here in Georgia.
 

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idk my halogens head lamps suck, looks like someone put spot lights in, I can see 1 focus'd beam no periferal lighting at all, but i do love my 52" led , 65$ on craigs list was off jk so i trimmed mounts 1/2" each side to fit, and that sucker will turn 150 deg rad, 100ft out of total darkness into daylight. and to me its already paid off as i rolled into a wreck on highway and they were all to happy to have the lighting to extract the driver. but i don't dare ever use this thing with any oncoming traffic
 

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I do a lot of night driving and see just fine with the stock lighting on my TJ. Don't understand why young people (yes I'm touching 60yo) have to swap in these super bright lights of different colors. More of a hazard to the on coming traffic from blinding the people in the other lane.
LOL, put in a set of TL or JW's and those 60 year old eyes will be shocked at what you have NOT been seeing! My TL are equivalent to my buddy's Audi in respect to brightness and cut off.
Most people put a lift on their Jeep but never re aim their headlights.

There are all kinds of poor quality lights out there that are extremely bright. They cast light everywhere, blinding oncoming traffic. That doesn't mean all aftermarket lights are bad or not worth the money.
 

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My problem is the LED light waves are tighter and straighter, meaning an object is either lit or not. The shadows behind are more harsh. Other lighting the wave lengths seem to be able to wrap around a little bit giving more of the picture and not such a stark contrast. I noticed it in my girls jeep, but the proof came more into my professional life trying to look down into engine bays.

Waiting for a happy medium, one which isn't ridiculously expensive either.
 

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I tend to agree CJ. I bitched about LEDs round about a year ago, but the general consensus was user error on my end (lamp selection).

While I agree, LEDs are great for various applications, however I don't particularly care for the LOOK-AT-ME cast of a LED. I prefer the glow of an incandescent/sealed beam.
 

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LOL, put in a set of TL or JW's and those 60 year old eyes will be shocked at what you have NOT been seeing! My TL are equivalent to my buddy's Audi in respect to brightness and cut off.
Most people put a lift on their Jeep but never re aim their headlights.

There are all kinds of poor quality lights out there that are extremely bright. They cast light everywhere, blinding oncoming traffic. That doesn't mean all aftermarket lights are bad or not worth the money.
To each their own

Like I said earlier I can see just fine with the halogen bulbs the TJ came with. Have HID's in my pickup and quite honestly there really isn't much difference in the two as far as distance or peripheral lighting . Sure the HID is a whiter light compared to the halogen that's about it.

For the cost of JW's or similar, just can't justify spending that much money to replace something that works just fine. Not to mention the hassles that so many have reported in forums on swapping incandescent bulbs for LED's in vehicles like the TJ. Now whether those folks knew what they were doing when it comes to wiring and electrical systems....well I'll let the readers of their threads decide.

Most of the vehicle I come in contact with bad lighting in my nightly travels are not lifted Jeeps or trucks. Cars at normal ride height with lights that burn through a persons retinas. If they're cheap lights or not I don't have a clue, still a danger to the motoring public. Not only the initial blinding but with the higher intensity of the light the longer it takes to regain what night vision you had before coming in contact with said vehicle.

Ever look into a flashlight at night then look away? All you see for a few seconds is that flashlight reflecting in your eyes, same thing with non DOT approved or poorly adjusted headlights. At 60 MPH a few seconds can be life or death in some cases.
 
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