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The Worst-rated Cars On The Market
Jeep Wrangler

The classic, athletic Wrangler might be beloved by Jeep fans, but it gets no love from Consumer Reports, which listed it as the worst two-row mid-sized SUV of 2019. In 2014, the publication deemed it the “worst value” in its category, noting that the Wrangler was “hard-riding, ponderous, uncomfortable and unreliable.” And during graduation season 2018, Jalopnik posted an essay on why the Jeep Wrangler is a terrible idea for a teen’s first car, as the car is particularly unsafe when piloted by an inexperienced driver.
Among all 11 compact SUVs that J.D. Power reviewed in 2019, the Wranger came in dead last for dependability.
 

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The traditional Jeep (CJ/Wrangler) has long had a history of being slammed by reviewers. That's why they have long been such poor sellers in the market place - NOT. They are such poor sellers that almost never do you see rebates on them and they had to expand production on a second production line in Toledo.

Are they the best selling vehicle - no, but they have a definite presence in the market. I have had a total of 5 Jeep Wranglers (2 YJs, 1 TJ, and 2 JKUs all purchased new except the TJ) and each one has never been a maintenance problem. When I bought my first one, I was warned about how much trouble they were to keep running. While it was an XJ, I put 89,000 trouble free miles on it and was the reason I bought my first YJ to sit alongside the XJ.

My two JKUs are the best two road vehicles I have ever owned. Not the most comfortable, but sitting up in the vehicle instead of almost sitting on the floor and they have been stable on the road. Try to take a CU best pick over the Rubicon and see what happens.
 

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The Worst-rated Cars On The Market
Jeep Wrangler

The classic, athletic Wrangler might be beloved by Jeep fans, but it gets no love from Consumer Reports, which listed it as the worst two-row mid-sized SUV of 2019. In 2014, the publication deemed it the “worst value” in its category, noting that the Wrangler was “hard-riding, ponderous, uncomfortable and unreliable.” And during graduation season 2018, Jalopnik posted an essay on why the Jeep Wrangler is a terrible idea for a teen’s first car, as the car is particularly unsafe when piloted by an inexperienced driver.
Among all 11 compact SUVs that J.D. Power reviewed in 2019, the Wranger came in dead last for dependability.
Well, we know your position on Wrangler. Personally, Consumer Reports hates domestic autos and who cares what the Toilet bowl cleaner evaluator thinks about a vehicle. BTW .. Read up on what Auto Nation says regarding Wranglers Value.. Search WF .. there are articles posted.
 

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The Worst-rated Cars On The Market
Jeep Wrangler

The classic, athletic Wrangler might be beloved by Jeep fans, but it gets no love from Consumer Reports, which listed it as the worst two-row mid-sized SUV of 2019. In 2014, the publication deemed it the “worst value” in its category, noting that the Wrangler was “hard-riding, ponderous, uncomfortable and unreliable.” And during graduation season 2018, Jalopnik posted an essay on why the Jeep Wrangler is a terrible idea for a teen’s first car, as the car is particularly unsafe when piloted by an inexperienced driver.
Among all 11 compact SUVs that J.D. Power reviewed in 2019, the Wranger came in dead last for dependability.
Mmmm... ;)

4453383
 

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Can we get a mod in here to just lump this post in with the Forbes review from a few years ago too?
 

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Appreciate the troll post, but I quit (as well as any other informed automotive enthusiast) paying attention to Consumer Reports back in the early 90s.

Proof positive of the ignorance of their statements: "worst value" Um, anyone take a look at resale value of the Wrangler? Any generation? I'm not going to comment on the driving prowess when compared to a more "modern" machine, but reality is, market demand has ALWAYS been high as have been prices, and there is no sign of that slowing down. So as with any other review those idiots do, it seems they are trying to sway or impact opinion to their way of thinking to justify their nonsense.

Just because it is not as safe (based on the measures tested) as a Tesla, or can run without oil for a year like a Corolla, doesn't make it an unreliable vehicle. I personally think the definition of "reliable" is at best poorly defined (I understand the statistics, but don't agree with the logic). Is my almost 9 year old Wrangler unreliable because I shredded the serpentine belt the other day? At that age on the original I'd say no, and that it was MY fault for not inspecting or changing it sooner. I actually was glad that I could fix it on the spot with basic hand tools. Doesn't that speak well to the "value" of the vehicle? Not having to take the time to get a tow truck, wait for some overpriced corporate lackey mechanic to rob me blind at a dealer to do a simple repair seems to lend itself to some unrecognized benefits of the simple design. Take that to being out in the back country (you know, what the vehicle was designed for) and that simplicity and robust design makes it a better choice than ALL of the independently suspended lemming mobiles they love so much.

Thus, why Consumer Reports is a bunch of bobble headed idiots serving no purpose in the analysis of the "value" of a machine.

And don't get me started on Jalopnik. When those morons started with the political posts some time back, they got categorized in the same manner as many professional sports and the entertainment industries: as part of the problem.
 

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I've read the same post, but still went out and bought another JKU this past March. I have a 16yo daughter (a 14yo son will be coming up real soon learning to drive) that is learning to drive in my 2016 and my wife's 2013 JKU. My advice to my daughter when we drive is if you can learn to drive safely in these vehicles, driving a normal car will be a little easier. We both have lifts and 35's on our jeeps, so they do drift a little on the highway and my daughter is learning to adjust for that drift. She does state she wants a jeep, a little older one with a little smaller tire.

I have seen and loved Wranglers for years and if I had believed everything I had read from Consumer Reports - I would not have bought one and stayed with SUV's that I have had in the past (Tahoe's and Escalade). If I had bought my Wrangler for the comfort or smoothness of the ride - then I would have been an idiot - because it does ride a little rough - it is the style of vehicle.
 

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Appreciate the troll post, but I quit (as well as any other informed automotive enthusiast) paying attention to Consumer Reports back in the early 90s.

Proof positive of the ignorance of their statements: "worst value" Um, anyone take a look at resale value of the Wrangler? Any generation? I'm not going to comment on the driving prowess when compared to a more "modern" machine, but reality is, market demand has ALWAYS been high as have been prices, and there is no sign of that slowing down. So as with any other review those idiots do, it seems they are trying to sway or impact opinion to their way of thinking to justify their nonsense.

Just because it is not as safe (based on the measures tested) as a Tesla, or can run without oil for a year like a Corolla, doesn't make it an unreliable vehicle. I personally think the definition of "reliable" is at best poorly defined (I understand the statistics, but don't agree with the logic). Is my almost 9 year old Wrangler unreliable because I shredded the serpentine belt the other day? At that age on the original I'd say no, and that it was MY fault for not inspecting or changing it sooner. I actually was glad that I could fix it on the spot with basic hand tools. Doesn't that speak well to the "value" of the vehicle? Not having to take the time to get a tow truck, wait for some overpriced corporate lackey mechanic to rob me blind at a dealer to do a simple repair seems to lend itself to some unrecognized benefits of the simple design. Take that to being out in the back country (you know, what the vehicle was designed for) and that simplicity and robust design makes it a better choice than ALL of the independently suspended lemming mobiles they love so much.

Thus, why Consumer Reports is a bunch of bobble headed idiots serving no purpose in the analysis of the "value" of a machine.

And don't get me started on Jalopnik. When those morons started with the political posts some time back, they got categorized in the same manner as many professional sports and the entertainment industries: as part of the problem.
You definitely GET The LIKE... I go back to Iacocca days and his ongoing battle with CR -- It you want a review by the same people that review Toilet Bowl cleaners..
 

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It all really comes down to how well the Wrangler holds its value. If you end up not liking its oddities, or having problems with it, should have minimal trouble unloading it for less of a loss than most any other vehicle over the same duration of ownership. That alone could make up a lot of money spent on repairs even if you end up in that boat. I was skeptical of the Chrysler/FCA reliability when I was considering buying my first Jeep, but the strong resale value gave me enough comfort to go for it. That and the late model JKs actually didn't rate too bad for reliability, I think even Consumer Reports showed them as at least being better than most other Jeep models.
 
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