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My 95 YJ 2.5l AT is showing code 27 for an injector. Ran all tests from Dodge Alldata and it came back as a bad computer. I cannot find another one to replace it, so I was going to send it in and have it repaired. But before I do, is there anyway to fix it DIY or does anyone here have one available?
 

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Welcome

 

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Welcome to the Forum Teegh,

Another possible resource is wranglerfix. He does primarily TJs but he might also do YJs. Google "wranglerfix", then call or email him.

Let us know if he can help YJs.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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So do the capacitors control the whole computer? I'm not a technician by any means. And I have emailed WranglerFix. Waiting for a response. Thank y'all
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I had an electrician at work replace all three capacitors. Unfortunately my issue is still ongoing. What other ideas could help alleviate my problems?
 

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We would need more details, did the shop use a Chrysler OBD1 reader?, what issues are you having exactly?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
When you start the Jeep, the check engine comes on and you can smell gas and see the fumes emitting from the tailpipe.

We did not have an OBD1 reader. A buddy of mine is a master technician for Ford. We got on Alldata and used Dodge's information to run tests for the issue I was having. My issue is a code 27 for the injectors. That's the tests that we ran. No issue with the injectors. No wiring issue. No issue with any relays. Ran all tests that Dodge said to and the outcome was a bad computer (according to the information from Dodge Alldata). Any ideas?
 

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I had an issue with my exhaust a couple years ago on a trip, stopped by a few shops to get some tests done and the majority of these shops couldn’t diagnose beyond the blinking lights on the dash, so I found an auto restoration shop thinking as they work on older vehicles they might have the correct diagnostic equipment, well they didn’t... but as luck would have it one of the guys father was the head mechanic at the local Jeep dealer and had an old Chrysler DRBII scanner tucked away, using it we were able to read live data direct as it was coming similar to what’s available on OBD2 vehicles.

Moral of the story find some one who has the correct diagnostic equipment as not everyone does, younger mechanics might have never even seen one.

There was a Snap-on diagnostic tool that I heard worked as well, though it was not available anymore the last time I checked.

Here is the diagnostic manual.

Although what I would do is test individually the various sensors in relation to fuel before I went that route.

Here are some nice tutorials for testing

You can also find more literature in my signature by clicking the
 
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